Outliers: Embracing your Vision

Speakers

Dr. John Shufeldt

Dr. John Shufeldt

Dr. Shufeldt has been practicing emergency medicine since 1986. However, his professional and personal identity extends far beyond the typical role of a doctor. He is a serial entrepreneur, having founded the largest privately held urgent care group in the US, and after selling in 2010, he created MeMD, an on-demand healthcare service that connects patients with medical providers who can diagnose issues and write prescriptions through a secure video visit. He is a lawyer, entrepreneur, professional pilot, a speaker, SWAT team doctor, and author. Dr. Shufeldt has started his own law firm as well as a publishing company among many other endeavors.

He is an adjunct law professor at the ASU Sandra Day O’Connor College of Law and has taught courses for the W.P. Carey School of Business, MBA and Health Sector Management program.

Lastly, and perhaps his most admirable occupation, he is a self proclaimed “serial learner”, acquiring a new degree every 10 years since his medical degree. After earning a BA from Drake University, and MD from Rosalind Franklin University, he earned his MBA from the W.P. Carey School of Business, and his law degree from the Sandra Day O’Connor College of Law at ASU. Most recently, Dr. Shufeldt received his Six Sigma Black Belt from the Fulton School of Engineering to learn more about LEAN process and sharpen his project management skills. He is a proud member of the Sun Devil Community.

Dr. Shufeldt is thrilled to be giving a talk for TEDxASU titled, “The Question We Need to Stop Asking Our Children,” which will help force us all to look ahead when it comes to our professional and personal goals.

Dr. Bertram Jacobs

Dr. Bertram Jacobs

Dr. Jacobs is a Professor of Virology in the School of Life Sciences and the Biodesign Institute at Arizona State University. The main interest of Dr. Jacobs’ lab is poxvirus:host interactions. His lab particularly focuses on the evasion of the innate immune interferon defenses by poxviruses. Disabling of the immune evasion genes in vaccinia virus has allowed the generation of highly attenuated strains of vaccinia virus as improved vaccine vectors for diseases such as HIV, as well as viruses to potentially treat cancer. Dr. Jacobs was awarded the Governor’s Innovator of the Year Award in Academia for his lab’s work in vaccine development.

Dr. Jacobs received his Ph.D. in Biochemistry from the University of California, Berkeley and did post-doctoral research at the University of California, Santa Barbara, before taking a faculty position at Arizona State University. Dr. Jacobs has been a member of the NIH Virology Study Section, and has served on numerous biodefense-related study sections. He has been an active collaborator with Russian scientists at VECTOR, home of the Russian smallpox repository. Currently Dr. Jacobs serves as Chair of the Arizona State University Institutional Biosafety Committee, and is Director of the School of Life Sciences.

Dr. Jacobs’ teaching interests include HIV prevention education to lay audiences. In this regard, he teaches a highly regarded interdisciplinary HIV class at ASU and spends several weeks each year in Africa teaching HIV prevention. Dr. Jacobs serves on the Board of Directors of two non-profit organizations dealing with public health, Aunt Rita’s Foundation and HEAL, International.

Throughout the course of history, viruses have been looked upon as agents of disease with little public insight on their potential benefits to society. Dr. Jacobs will be dispelling this notion by discussing how viruses can actually be one of the greatest tools in medicine going into the future. His talk will be called “Viruses: Infectious Medicine”.

Dr. Mari Koerner

Dr. Mari Koerner

Dr. Mari Koerner received her PhD in curriculum and instruction from the University of Illinois at Chicago. An English literature major in college, she began her career in education when she became a second grade teacher on the West side of Chicago. She has held faculty and administrative positions at Roosevelt University in Chicago and the University of Massachusetts Boston. She was appointed as a professor and as the dean of the College of Teacher Education and Leadership at Arizona State University’s West campus in July 2006 and, after the merging of the three colleges of education at ASU, she was appointed dean of Mary Lou Fulton Teachers College in 2010, ranked 17th among the nation’s top education graduate programs by U.S. News & World Report 2016.

Dr. Koerner has reached out to the national professional community by publishing in professional education journals and by presenting at major education conferences regarding teacher preparation. Dr. Koerner has been either principal investigator or co-director of many grant-funded programs, including a Teacher Quality Partnership grant for $11.5M in 2014 for reforming teacher prep programs to include methodologies in math and science for English language learners, and a Kellogg Foundation Award to integrate community knowledge into the yearlong student teaching residency, iTeachAZ

Dr. Koerner serves on four boards: Rodel Foundation, Phoenix Teach for America, Desert Botanical Gardens, and the Arizona Business and Education Council. Often asked to serve on national and local panels and review boards, she testified before the United States Senate’s committee on Health, Education, Labor and Pensions in 2013 about the implementation of a $35M Teacher Quality Program grant and the subsequent innovations in the iTeach AZ undergraduate teacher preparation program at Mary Lou Fulton Teachers College.

Primary school education in Arizona is notorious for its faults, current ranking as one of the worst states in the nation. Dr. Koerner will be speaking on how to engage children of all ages into a natural phenomenon everyone is born with, the desire to learn. Her talk will be called “Can You Teach a Dolphin How to Type?”

Dr. Maulik Parikh

Dr. Maulik Parikh

Dr. Maulik Parikh is a theoretical physicist. He is an Associate Professor in the Department of Physics and at the Beyond Center for Fundamental Concepts in Science at Arizona State University. Dr. Parikh‘s research spans numerous aspects of gravitation, including the foundations of Einstein’s general theory of relativity, the physics of black holes and their event horizons, and gravitational aspects of quantum gravity, particularly string theory. His paper on Hawking radiation from black holes has been cited over a thousand times and he has received the first award from the Gravity Research Foundation, perhaps the top prize exclusively for gravitational research.

Dr. Parikh obtained his bachelor‘s degree from the University of California at Berkeley, where he majored in physics, mathematics, and English. He obtained his master’s and PhD from Princeton University, where he once house­sat Albert Einstein’s house and where he was supervised by Frank Wilczek, a 2004 physics Nobel laureate. After postdoctoral positions at the University of Utrecht in the Netherlands and at Columbia University, he held a faculty position in India at the Inter­University Centre for Astronomy and Astrophysics, before joining Arizona State University. Dr. Parikh enjoys both research and teaching and has won teaching awards from Arizona State University and from Princeton University.

A black hole is an object whose gravitational pull is so strong that not even light can escape it. Yet, in 1974, the theoretical physicist Stephen Hawking showed that when the whimsical theory of quantum mechanics is applied to black holes, particles actually do manage to get out. In this talk, Dr. Parikh will describe "How to Escape from a Black Hole."

Jimmy Arwood

Jimmy Arwood

Jimmy Arwood has been a rising student organizer and activist on behalf of the collegiate community. Not only has he aided the Andrew Goodman Foundation in registering nearly 1,000 voters this past year, but he has also operated his own student organization. Students for Affordable Tuition (SFAT) is a non-partisan campus organization Arwood founded last fall in response to the $99 million in cuts to universities. Currently SFAT spans 3 campuses including Arizona State Universities Downtown Phoenix, Tempe, and the University of Arizona in Tucson.

His passion for politics has long outdated his time fighting university budget cuts however. In 2006, His father was appointed director of the state Energy Office in Arizona, sparking Arwood’s interest in politics from a young age. While enrolled at Valley Lutheran High School he was selected as a delegate to a civics education program called Boys State. His success there garnered him respect among peers and superiors alike, eventually leading him to be selected to attend Boys Nation in Washington D.C. as one of the two delegates from Arizona. While in D.C. Arwood was invited to the White House to meet president Obama, as well as Congressional members.

The 20 year old Phoenix native plans to continue to study Public Policy within ASU’s School of Public Affairs as he continues to ponder a career in ministry and policy work. Arwood is still heavily involved in the ASU community, as he will be the next Vice President of Policy on the Downtown Phoenix campus. His love of seeing others fulfill their potential has led him to TEDx where he will be ecstatic to deliver a talk entitled “Why My Education Matters to You”

Dr. Athena Aktipis

Dr. Athena Aktipis

Athena Aktipis is an Assistant Professor in the Psychology Department at Arizona State University, Collaborative Researcher at the Biodesign Institute, and co-Director of the Human Generosity Project. Dr. Aktipis studies cooperation across life, from human sharing to the evolution of multicellularity. From cells to societies, several general principles arise again and again that facilitate cooperation, including helping one another in times of need. Dr. Aktipis’s research integrates laboratory studies of human behavior, computational modeling and fieldwork at sites around the world to explore fundamental questions about the nature of cooperation.

Dr. Aktipis completed her BA at Reed College (Psychology), her PhD at University of Pennsylvania (Psychology) and post-doctoral work at University of Arizona (Ecology and Evolutionary Biology) She was a fellow at the Institute for Advanced Study in Berlin (Wissenschaftskolleg) for 2013-2014 in the Cancer Evolution working group. She is a cooperation theorist, theoretical evolutionary biologist, and cancer biologist who now works at the intersection of these fields. Dr. Aktipis is the author of the forthcoming book from Princeton University Press "Evolution in the flesh: Cancer and the transformation of life," which explores cancer as the resulting of cheating in complex multicellular cooperation.

In her TEDx talk, Athena asks "Do you believe in Generosity?" Drawing from work as part of The Human Generosity Project, Dr. Aktipis addresses the questions of whether we help one another out of the goodness of our hearts or because we expect to get something back in return. By looking at need-based sharing across life, we can ask how cooperation arose in the evolution of life and how humans are similar - and different - in the big picture of the evolution of life on our planet.

Dr. Carlo Maley

Dr. Carlo Maley

Dr. Carlo Maley applies tools from evolutionary biology and ecology to tumors in order to understand and prevent the evolution of malignancy and therapeutic resistance.

While interested in all cancers, Dr. Maley currently works on Barrett’s esophagus, acute myeloid leukemia, lung cancer, and breast cancer. In this work, his team uses measures of the rate of evolution in the tumors to predict which patients will develop malignancy and succumb to their disease. He is also working on novel approaches to prevent the evolution of resistance and transform cancer from an acute disease to a chronic, non-lethal disease. His team is working on comparative oncology to discover how large long-lived organisms like whales and elephants are able to prevent cancer much more effectively than humans.

Dr. Maley earned a bachelor’s degree in computer science and psychology from Oberlin College. A Marshall Scholarship allowed him to obtain his master’s degree in zoology (evolutionary theory) from the University of Oxford. He completed his education at Massachusetts Institute of Technology, with a doctorate in computer science (computational biology), and then went on to postdoctoral training in the evolution of cancer at the University of New Mexico and the Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center.
In his talk, Dr. Maley will be shedding light on an interesting phenomenon that occurs in nature, which is now known as Peto’s Paradox. This describes the phenomenon that even though larger animals have more cells than smaller animals, this does not necessarily correlate to more cancer rates. Dr. Maley will be delivering a talk titled “How Nature Has Already Beat Cancer”.